Premium Beef from a Premium Source


Lean, low-fat Piedmontese beef doesn't sacrifice taste or tenderness

Those looking for a low-fat alternative to red meat may have found what they are looking for in naturally lean Certified Piedmontese beef. This product, produced by Great Plains Beef, is a premium natural beef that comes from Piedmontese cattle, a breed that originated in the Piedmont region of Italy during the 1870s, although cattle originally migrated there about 25,000 years ago. They are known for their unique genetic composition that allows them to develop extra muscle but very little fat. This sets Piedmontese apart by offering a healthy alternative to heavily marbled beef without sacrificing the taste or tenderness we get from our favorite burgers and steaks.

Great Plains Beef employs a group of ranchers to raise their Piedmontese cattle throughout the Great Plains region, a vast expanse of prairielands that span across parts of Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Montana, Wyoming, Oklahoma, Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota and parts of Canada. Now, there are about 2,000 registered pureblood Piedmontese in the United States, and Certified Piedmontese is exclusively produced by Great Plains Beef. These cows are raised in a natural and humane environment, are fed a vegetarian diet, never receive steroids, supplemental growth hormones or antibiotics and are raised on open-range, sustainable ranches.

Piedmontese beef, despite its leanness, boasts superior taste from filet mignon to steak tips and ground beef. The beef is also high in omega-3, omega-6 and protein, and even has less calories and cholesterol than conventional beef. Certified Piedmontese beef products are available for purchase through the Great Plains Beef website, and are also available at select retail stores throughout the U.S. 

For more information, visit the Piedmontese official website

Save up to 71% on a variety of grilling favorites! Plus, order today and get 4 free burgers and 4 free gourmet franks.


Related Content:

Beef Cuts 101

Guide to Cattle Breeds

Intro to Beef Grades