"Audition" follows the story of Aoyama, a lonely, middle-aged widower who holds a mock audition for the "role" of his new wife.

On-screen torture, when done correctly, can be so unsettling as to linger in the viewer's consciousness for days after the credits have rolled. Such is the case with Takashi Miike's "Audition," a Japanese horror film that features a notorious torture scene so disturbing that it obliterates any memory of the film's fairly plodding first act. "Audition" follows the story of Aoyama, a lonely, middle-aged widower who holds a mock audition for the "role" of his new wife and promptly falls for an enigmatic young contestant named Asami. It turns out that Asami has some pretty serious skeletons in her closet — the people in her past have a habit of turning up dead or horribly disfigured. Before this unlikely love story can bloom, Asami discovers evidence of Aoyami's ex-wife and becomes psychotically jealous. We'll spare you the graphic details of what happens next, but suffice to say that poor old Aoyami learns firsthand the painful meaning of the adage, "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned."