Since 1969, restaurant, hotel, travel & other witty reviews by a handpicked, worldwide team of discerning professionals—and your views, too.

CRAPS
To the untrained eye, craps is easily the most confusing and intimidating of the table games, yet it’s certainly the most exciting and potentially the most rewarding of all to play. If the dice are hot, everyone in the casino knows it, because of all the screaming and applause emanating from those ringing the oblong table, as players tend to side with the shooter against the house.
If a table is cold, however, no game can be more depressing and unstimulating.

Craps is one game that can’t be learned by simply watching the action. For one thing, it’s difficult for a beginner to tell when a 7 is good or bad, and whether or not to bet with the shooters or against them. Do yourself—and the dealers—a favor by taking a lesson or two before laying down the bucks.
The player with the dice throws the "come-out roll." If the shooter rolls a 7 or 11, players with money on the "PASS LINE" win. If the player rolls "craps"---a 2, 3 or 12---the house wins the money bet on the "PASS LINE." The player continues to roll to make a point, which can be any number except 2, 3, 7, 11 or 12. The point is marked with a round puck. If the player hits that point before rolling a 7, those betting on the "PASS" and "COME" lines win. If the player gets a 7 before rolling the point, the house wins all the money on the "COME" line, and those who gambled on the "DON'T PASS" and "DON'T COME" lines also win. In craps, there are many other table bets possible, as well, all with various odds and payouts.

One suggestion: Always study the tables before jumping into the action. If it’s a hot table, it probably will be crowded and noisy. A steady turnover, on the other hand, is a solid clue that a table is cold. Of course, luck can change at any time, and with the addition or subtraction of a single player.

 Learn more games with our Gaming Guide.


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