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Freedman's

2619 Sunset Blvd. Send to Phone
213-568-3754
Hip Jewish “deli” in Silver Lake vamps on old-school classics like matzoh ball soup, brisket and latkes, along with standout martinis.

Cuisine
Open
Lunch Tues.-Fri., Dinner Tues.-Sat., Brunch Sat.-Sun.
Features

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Freedman's, Los Angeles, CA

Freedman's Restaurant Review

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About Freedman's: Brother-sister team Jonah and Amanda Freedman conceived of this very 21st century next-wave Jewish deli that brings the genre to hipsterdom in Silver Lake. (They self-describe it as a “Jewish-ish experience.”) The menu was created by well-regarded rising chef Liz Johnson (Mimi, NYC), who has since departed from Freedman’s, but her creative vision continues to overlay a quirky, haute approach to classic Jewish dishes in surprising and pleasing ways.

The décor: From perhaps one of the ugliest strip malls in LA (and that’s saying a lot) step inside this intimate jewel box of a space that instantly transports you into a slightly nostalgic, magical realm that’s more reminiscent of a vintage speakeasy than a Jewish deli. Designer floral wallpaper surrounds marble-topped café tables with midcentury molded chairs; oak floors glisten beneath antique lamps, and the centerpiece mahogany-toned bar along one wall hosts stylish locals sipping very good cocktails. The magic is somewhat marred by an eclectic rock and roll soundtrack that’s distractingly loud, and service, while friendly and informative, can be maddeningly slow.

Likes: Trout roe popovers; convivial neighborhood crowd; inviting bar.
Dislikes: A very, very loud room --- you may need to shout to your dining companions across the table.

Food & Drinks: Freedman’s is riding the crest of a transformational culinary zeitgeist in LA, where a generation of young chefs and restaurateurs from all traditions (Mexican, Asian, Southern) is exploring classic cuisines but evolving them in compelling directions beyond the “just add French technique” formula so popular over the past few decades. There’s enough Jewish purism on the menu here to honor icons --- a fine chopped liver, and a pristine smoked fish assortment are two examples. The matzoh ball soup’s rich, clear chicken broth (albeit a tad salty) floats delicious and delicate little matzohs. A huge, rustic mutton chop gets a traditional Sephardic nod boosted with anchovies. True destination dishes, however, start with a fairylike bowl of airy popovers with whipped crème fraîche, chives and trout roe, or irresistible crisped whitefish cigars, rolled and fried in light pastry, brushed with a honey vinegar glaze and dusted with caraway. A sweetbread schnitzel is perched jauntily on red cabbage salad with fresh dill and quince-imbued Russian dressing. And the handsome platter of herb-strewn glazed brisket (that serves 4), seen at practically every other table, is fork-tender, flavorful, and just for fun, dramatically carved tableside with an electric knife. It comes with giant smoked bone marrow for some delightful added decadence. New Yorkers may disapprove of the ethereal, fluffy cheesecake topped with guava, but likely won’t leave any crumbs. The wine list is Eastside sophisticated (think sparkling from Catalonia or Savatiano from Greece), and classic cocktails and martinis are pretty and well-crafted. Look for deli sandwiches, including pastrami, beef tongue and luxe bagel combos, at lunch and brunch.
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