Restaurant Ratings by City

Restaurant Rankings

Browse the list of areas below so you can search and compare the restaurants by cities based on their food ratings.

U.S. Domestic

Albany
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Birmingham
Boston
Buffalo
Cape Cod
Central Coast, CA
Charleston

Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Mountains
Columbus
Dallas/Fort Worth
Daytona Beach
Denver
Detroit
Gainesville
Grand Rapids, MI
Green Bay, WI
Greenwich, CT
Harrisburg, PA
Hartford, CT
Hawaii
Houston
Idaho
Indianapolis
Jackson Hole
Jacksonville
Jersey Shore
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Long Island, NY
Los Angeles Area
Louisville
Maine
Maryland Suburbs (DC)
Memphis
Miami/South Florida
Milwaukee
Monterey/Carmel
Napa/Sonoma, CA
Nashville
New Hampshire
New Orleans
New York
Norfolk/Hampton Roads
North Jersey
Northwest Florida
Oklahoma City
Orange County, CA
Orlando
Outer Banks, NC
Palm Springs, CA
Park City, UT
Philadelphia
Phoenix/Scottsdale
Pittsburgh

Portland
Providence
Raleigh/Durham
Richmond
Sacramento
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco/Bay Area
San Jose
Santa Barbara
Santa Fe/Taos
Sarasota
Seattle
Sedona/Flagstaff
Southwest Florida
St. Louis
Tahoe/Reno
Tampa Bay
Tucson, AZ
Twin Cities
Ventura County, CA
Vermont
Virginia Suburbs (DC)
Washington, DC
Westchester, NY

 

Canada

Montréal
Vancouver
Quebec City Toronto


 

International

The Bahamas
Beijing, China
France
Germany
Hong Kong
Italy
London, U.K.
Los Cabos, Mexico

Mexico City, Mexico
Monaco
The Netherlands
Paris, France
Other cities in France
Shanghai, China
Singapore
South Africa


Spain
Sydney, Australia
Tel Aviv, Israel
Tokyo, Japan
United Arab Emirates

 

> If you’d prefer to search for restaurants by cuisine or name, choose your city from GAYOT’s Dining Guide.

What decides the rating of a restaurant?

What is on the plate is by far the most important factor. The quality of produce is among the most telling signs of a restaurant’s culinary status. It requires a great deal of commitment and money to stock the finest grades and cuts of meat and the finest quality of fish. Ask any sushi chef if there’s a difference in tuna, and with the flash of his knife he will tell you there certainly is. One extra-virgin olive oil is not the same as another. Ditto for chocolates, pastas, spices and one thousand other ingredients. Quality restaurants also attune themselves to seasonal produce, whether it is local berries or truffles from France. Freshness is all-important, too, and a telling indication of quality. This means not only using fresh rather than frozen fish, for example, but also preparing everything from scratch at the last possible moment, from appetizers through desserts.

What else do we look for in rating restaurants?

Details are telling: If sauces are homogeneous, you know that the kitchen is taking shortcuts. The bread on the table is always a tip-off; similarly, the house wine can speak volumes about the culinary attitude and level of an establishment. Wine complements food, and wine lists and offerings can be revelatory. A list doesn’t have to be long or expensive to show a commitment to quality.



Finally, among the very finest restaurants, creativity and innovation are often determining factors.

These qualities, however, are relatively unimportant for simple, good restaurants, where the quality and consistency of what appears on the plates is the central factor. A restaurant that serves grilled chicken well is to be admired more than a restaurant that attempts some failed marriage of chicken and exotic produce, or some complicated chicken preparation that requires a larger and more talented kitchen brigade than is on hand. Don’t be taken in by attempted fireworks that are really feeble sideshows.

> Learn How to Use the GAYOT Restaurant Rating System